Category Archives: Uncategorized

Join Pare in Commemorating Dam Safety Awareness Day

By J. Matthew Bellisle, Senior Vice President of the Geotechnical Division of Pare Corporation and the Co-Chair of the Dam Management Committee of the Environmental Business Council of New England

Dam Safety Awareness Day was established to commemorate the lives lost in the Johnstown Flood. The tragedy occurred on May 31, 1889 when the South Fork Dam burst sending a flood of water that resulted in the destruction of 1,600 homes, $17 million in property damage (current value of approximately $425 million) and the deaths of 2,209 people (including the entirety of 99 families; of the deceased, 396 were children) in the valley below in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.  While this is the worst dam failure in the United States it has become symbolic in our history.  Unfortunately it is not the only incident of dam failure.

As we remember the lives lost and the heroes who worked to minimize damage and save lives, we also must remember the lessons learned in regard to dam engineering. We need to put our own hubris aside and recognize the impact that these engineered structures have on our communities and environment.

This country—especially New England—grew due to the power harnessed by dams during the industrial revolution, by the water impounded for irrigation and water supply, and by the additional navigation afforded by strategically placed and engineered dams and locks.  The dams that have greatly impacted our nation come in a multitude of forms–from concrete and earthen structures impounding large reservoirs, small earthen embankments and structures creating irrigation ponds, hydro-electric structures providing sustainable energy, to historic masonry structures from a time long past.  Our communities are surrounded by over 87,000 dams throughout the United States, which are a marvelous testament to our ability to engineer our surroundings to enable productivity, health, safety, and energy.

As today’ dams provide increasing levels of flood protection, energy, water supply, and environmental resource areas to support our communities, we need to remember three things.

  • First, dams do deteriorate over time. It would be incorrect to assume that the condition of the dam at any point in time will continue to represent the condition of the dam at some point in the future. There also comes a time when a dam is no longer providing a benefit and it should be removed.  It is only through continued diligence, observation, and maintenance that dams, bridges, roadways, and other parts of our national infrastructure will continue to serve the needs of the nation.
  • Second, financial resources are needed for routine maintenance and long-term repairs. However, just because money has been spent on the dam recently, the need for continued inspection by qualified personnel is still paramount to the long term performance of the dam.
  • Third, we are all stakeholders in continuing dam safety.  Ongoing steps to develop and maintain emergency action plans and procedures require support from our local communities to enable efficient notification, response, and recovery.

As we commemorate the Johnstown Flood let us take comfort knowing that dedicated regulators, designers and owners also remember these events and are taking positive steps to mitigate such incidents. Advances in the study of dam engineering have led to enhancements in hydraulic and soil modeling, which in turn have improved our understanding of the integration of the engineered environment with the natural environment. With the support of local and federal regulations we continue to protect the environment and the public by identifying and repairing aging dams, and removing those structures that are unsafe or no longer serve a beneficial purpose.  Ignoring complacency, we are taking positive steps to improve this nation’s dams and support the resources, opportunities and public which are so dependent upon these sometimes invisible engineered structures.

To learn more about dam safety and flooding, please download the two ebooks (‘Living with Dams: Know Your Risks’ and “Living with Dams: Extreme Rainfall Events’ prepared by the Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO) at  http://livingneardams.org/

Celebrating the 47th Annual Earth Day 2017!

By Chris Webber, Engineer at Pare Corporation and a member of Pare’s Sustainability Committee

The 47th annual Earth Day celebration, which has grown from a United States tradition to one shared by countries around the world, was held on April 22.

The idea for Earth Day was born out of the counterculture environment of the 1970’s, a time of protest and opposition to many established norms in the United States. Growing environmental unease backed by literature like the 1962 book Silent Spring and the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara served as the catalyst for the first Earth Day. Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson spearheaded a bipartisan effort to create events raising awareness across the country.  Over 20 million Americans turned out that day, which began a significant shift in environmental policy. The Environmental Protection Agency was formed before the end of the year and the passage of several major laws–including the Clean Air, Safe Drinking Water, Environmental Quality Improvement, and Endangered Species Acts–soon followed.

Earth Day expanded as a day of global awareness in 1990, with over 200 million people from 141 countries participating in events around the world. The event was followed by the United Nations Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit in 1992, which sought to address global environmental issues like increasing water use and climate change.  More recently, Earth Day 2016 marked the signing of the Paris Agreement as a worldwide effort to combat climate change.

Even as Earth Day seeks to promote global awareness through monumental events, the initial 1970’s grass roots mission to care for the environment in one’s local community continues.

It is that spirit that inspired Pare’s Sustainability Committee to hold its 6th Annual Earth Day Photo Contest with a theme of “Be Green Outside!”  The photos can be viewed at  http://blog.parecorp.com/2017/04/25/celebrate-earth-day-with-pare-by-voting-in-the-6th-annual-earth-day-photo-contest/.  Congratulations to Erika Klinkhammer, an Environmental Scientist in the Civil Division of Pare, for winning the contest with her photo of the Latimer Reef Lighthouse on Fisher Island in Long Island Sound.

Latimer Reef Lighthouse on Fisher Island in Long Island Sound taken by Erika Klinkhammer

In addition to the contest, several Pare employees participated in a local cleanup organized by the Rhode Island chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers Young Members Group (RI ASCE YM).  They participated in the 5th Annual Providence Earth Day Spring Cleaning event sponsored by the City of Providence, Providence Parks Department, and the Partnership for Providence Parks.   For the cleanup they were partnered with the West Broadway Neighborhood Association to help with the 33rd Annual Neighborhood Spring Cleanup.  More than 100 people came out to clean and improve this metropolitan neighborhood resulting in the pickup of 400 bags of trash, 300 bags of yard waste to be composted, more than a dozen mattresses, and several large items such as televisions and tires.  Despite the cold and rainy weather, Pare engineers Bobby Sykes, Jessica Damicis, and Marc Weller were cheerfully picking up trash, spreading new mulch in the play area, and helping to construct a brand new bocce court at the Dexter Training Ground Park.

Bobby Sykes who coordinated Pare’s involvement in the day stated, “I’m grateful to have participated in the earth day cleanup and to have had the opportunity to work with friends from engineering firms throughout Rhode Island. Pare has always had tremendous participation at our ASCE events, and I’m thankful I work for a company with so many like-minded individuals willing to donate a Saturday to give back to a local community.”

As April 22, 2018 approaches, there are many ways to participate in Earth Day activities; learn more at http://www.earthday.org/take-action/.  While the day is a fantastic way to stay environmentally conscious, simple efforts like recycling and composting at home and other small activities are great ways to reduce our environmental footprint throughout the year.  Every day is an opportunity to be a better steward of Planet Earth. Thanks to all who participated in this year’s Earth Day events; we’ll look forward to seeing you again next year!

 

Celebrate Earth Day with Pare by Voting in the 6th Annual Earth Day Photo Contest

The focus for Earth Day this year is Environmental and Climate Literacy so that we can build a “global citizenry fluent in the concepts of climate change and aware of its unprecedented threat to our Planet.” (Kathleen Rogers, President of Earth Day Network)  Following that mandate, parties across the globe joined together to respond to global climate change and global warming at the Paris Agreement.  Learn more at http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/climatechange/

In that spirit, the Sustainability Committee at Pare is pleased to share our 6th Annual Earth Day Photo Contest.   The theme of the contest this year is “Be Green Outside!”

Please enjoy the photos submitted by Pare’s staff below, and vote using the poll located at the bottom of this post. The winner of the 2017 Earth Day Photo Contest will receive a Gift Card to B-Good and their photo framed in the office. Voting will close at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, May 7.

 

 1. Handmade Water Quality

To treat runoff from the driveway, deck, and concrete walkway at our newly acquired home, we installed – by hand – water quality trenches with filter fabric. Our project also alleviated areas of standing water. The pipe system connected to an overflow discharge point after storing and treating a certain volume of runoff. We then capped off the project by raising the elevation about 18” with clean loam and new sod!

2. Franconia Ridge Vegetation Preservation

On the crest of Franconia Ridge in Lincoln New Hampshire, 5,260 feet up above sea level, a low rock path helps hikers protect the groundcover ridgetop vegetation.

3. British Columbia Roadtrip

 

This was from a road trip with my family up in British Columbia, an outdoor expedition into Alaska that definitely helped me appreciate being green outside.

4. 26.2 Emission Free Miles

You see stuff when you run. Stuff you don’t see when you drive. Little ponds. Nondescript trail heads. Wildlife. Unfortunately, you also see lots of trash, debris, roadkill. Running can give you a unique perspective on the environment and how we impact it.

5. An Early Appreciation of the Great Outdoors

To our family, “being green outside” typically means going for hikes and learning about nature. We came across this tree during a short hike in Scituate, RI. It was a great opportunity to discuss local wildlife and the role that specific animals, in this case beavers, have in the environment.

6. My Home Office

Wake. Skate. Work at Pare. Sleep. Repeat.

7. Mattapoisett Waterfront

Water front view of the Mattapoisett Marina that leads into Buzzards Bay. The sun is shining and the boating season is underway.

8. ‘It’s not easy being green’

A little green in an unexpected place. Almost 10 feet below grade in a dark catch basin this little guy found just enough sunlight to make it happen!

9. Latimer Reef Lighthouse on Fisher Island in Long Island Sound

Taken on the first cruise of the season in the Clam Ram, a mighty Boston Whaler coming out of hibernation. A nice day to test the electronics and run the engine, then sit in a protective harbor with a Sierra Nevada and a beautiful sunset. Beauty in nature at its finest.

10. The Dry Tortugas

The Dry Tortugas National Park is located 70 miles off the coast of Key West, FL and is home to the largest stone-masonry fort in United States. Over 300 species of birds, 5 species of sea turtles, 30 different species of coral, and several hundred species of fish are protected within the waters and islands that make up the national park.

11. Below the Tower

Stissing Fire Tower stretches 7 flights into the air above the Nature Conservancy and hiking trails in Pine Plains, NY. Formerly for use to spot forest fires, the tower is now a viewing spot for appreciation of the area’s natural resources.

12. Winds of Change

Engineers can be the stewards of a healthy planet through the implementation of clean, green, renewable energy. Rhode Island has begun paving the way with the construction of America’s first offshore wind farm.

13. Chasm Lake

Chasm Lake, Rocky National Park, CO

14. Hiking Activist

Enjoying Mass Audubon’s Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary while promoting recycling on Earth Day weekend.

15. Cliffs of Prince Edward Island

Ever since I was a young girl, I have been in awe of the impact that water can have on a shoreline after watching the waves wash away a house following a hurricane on the Outer Banks. This picture was taken in this fall on Prince Edward Island where the magnitude and simple beauty of the erosion took my breath away.

16. Kayaking on the Colorado River

The Colorado River system is a vital source of water for 40 million people in southwestern North America. The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs, and aqueducts, which in most years divert its entire flow for agricultural irrigation and domestic water supply. The Colorado’s large flow and steep gradient are used for generating hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West. Intensive water consumption has dried up the lower 100 miles (160 km) of the river, which has rarely reached the sea since the 1960s. The river (pictured outside Austin, TX) is also a great recreational resource. It offers visitors and city-dwellers a picturesque escape from city life and an opportunity to “be green outside”.

17. “Cueva Ventana”

An hour west of San Juan, Cueva Ventana, or “Window Cave,” can be found. The lush valley below maintains its natural beauty as the rural area is situated away from urban Puerto Rico.

18. Sanctuary

Water cascading from the 317-foot Vernal Falls at Yosemite National Park. Except for the thundering water, quiet as a church, not a conversation to be heard. Everyone enveloped in and reflecting on the natural beauty. To Be Green Outside is to be in the moment.

Vote for your favorite photo that best represents our theme of “Be Green Outside!”

.
1. Handmade Water Quality
1 Vote
2. Franconia Ridge Vegetation Preservation
2 Vote
3. British Columbia Roadtrip
1 Vote
4. 26.2 Emission Free Miles
2 Vote
5. An Early Appreciation of the Great Outdoors
2 Vote
6. My Home Office
1 Vote
7. Mattapoisett Waterfront
1 Vote
8. Its Not Easy Being Green
5 Vote
9. Latimer Reef Lighthouse on Fisher Island in Long Island Sound
11 Vote
10. The Dry Tortugas
5 Vote
11. Below the Tower
1 Vote
12.Winds of Change
2 Vote
13. Chasm Lake
1 Vote
14. Hiking Activist
2 Vote
15. Cliffs of Prince Edward Island
2 Vote
16. Kayaking on the Colorado River
0 Vote
17. “Cueva Ventana”
2 Vote
18. Sanctuary
1 Vote

 

 

 

 

 

E-Waste: Mounting Concern & What You Can Do

Did You Know???

  • “E-waste” (as electronic waste—anything with a battery or a cord—is frequently called) is the fastest growing waste stream in the world.  It is quickly filling our landfills and it has the potential to do significantly more harm than household trash.
  • The average lifespan of computers dropped from six years in 1997 to just two years by 2005, and cell phones have a life cycle of less than two years in developed countries.
  • The United States discarded more than 11 million tons of e-waste in 2014 (the data for 2015 and 2016 hasn’t been released yet) but only approximately 20-25% of that waste is recycled each year.
  • For every million cell phones we recycle, 35,000 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold, and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered.
  • Recycling one million laptops saves as much energy as the electricity used by more than 3,500 US homes in a year.

Electronics Recycling Drive

By:  Cari Orsi, P.E., LEED AP on behalf of Pare’s Sustainability Committee

The Pare Sustainability Committee is sensitive to the environment and understands the need for reduction in landfill waste, so in March we organized an Electronics Recycling Drive for Pare employees. Through partnership with Northeast Computer Recycling (NECR, http://www.northeastcomputerrecycling.com/), we were able to recycle broken and obsolete electronics rather than putting them in mainstream waste channels.  This year over 40 electronic items were collected including computer towers, monitors, printers, cell phones and various chargers.   Thanks to everyone at Pare who supported this green initiative!

Ryan Lagace, owner and operator of NECR, explained that he was motivated to open NECR after witnessing companies throwing away a lot of old equipment when he worked in the IT industry.  He had a vision to dismantle and recycle these items.  Ryan explained, “100% of the material we take in is recycled, including plastics and metals.  Everything is sorted out.  I even found a local company to recycle polystyrene, and I get a lot of that from packaging.” NECR is staying busy with multiple pickups daily from businesses in MA and RI.  Ryan’s advice about electronics recycling when asked was, “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle still rings true, but we don’t just recycle here.  I try to re-sell equipment when I can so items have a second life instead of getting dismantled.”

In addition to diverting waste from landfills, there are two important reasons for recycling electronics. First, materials that make up electronics are valuable resources (metals, plastics and glass), all of which require energy to obtain and produce for electronics. Second, electronics contain many different toxic materials including lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic.  These items cause more potential harm to the environment than your typical household trash.   Left sitting in landfills, these materials may leach into the soils and potentially into groundwater.

Everyone can help to reduce electronic waste; here are a few things to consider before making a purchase:

  • Do you really need that new electronic device?
  • Can you repair or upgrade components on the one you have?
  • If your old electronic items are still working, consider re-selling them or donating them instead of throwing them out or recycling them.

Here are a few additional things you can do to reduce waste:

To learn more about electronics recycling visit the US Environmental Protection Agency’s website at www.epa.gov/recycle/electronics-donation-and-recycling.

EPA electronics recycling

The Removal of the Old Mill Dam along the Charles River in Bellingham, MA

By Allen R. Orsi, P.E. Managing Engineer at Pare Corporation and a member of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials

It is a wonderful feeling when a vision comes to fruition, especially when it has taken years for the project to be completed.  The removal of the Old Mill Dam in Bellingham, Massachusetts is a good example of what can be accomplished through strong project partnerships.   Pare Corporation and the Town of Bellingham began conversations in 2008 about the future of the Old Mill Dam, which was found to be in poor structural condition.  At the time, the dam was classified as a ‘significant hazard potential dam’ by the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (MADCR) Office of Dam Safety.

Upon completion of several studies and evaluation of the benefits of dam removal versus rehabilitation, it was decided that removing the obsolete dam would increase public safety, save taxpayer dollars, and improve the ecosystem along the river.

Pare worked very closely with the Town to prepare a grant application for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA) Dam and Seawall Repair or Removal Program to secure funding for the majority of the design and permitting of the project, as well as a no-interest loan to offset the cost of construction.

Pare also worked with the Town to apply for and receive priority project status through the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration (DER).  Once funding was secured, Pare coordinated with DER to obtain environmental permits and draft dam removal plans that would minimize the impact of deconstruction on the environment.

For the project to be completed, Old Mill Pond was incrementally drained through partial demolition of the concrete spillway to allow for dam removal activity to be completed in a dewatered area.  Roughly 2,300 cubic yards of mercury-impacted sediment were removed from the pond and permanently disposed of onsite within a special containment berm constructed beyond the level of the post-dam removal 100-yr floodplain.  This approach saved significant costs to the Town associated with offsite disposal of the impacted sediment.  It also effectively removed 15 pounds of mercury from the riverine habitat.

Last week, temporary construction facilities were removed, allowing for the unrestricted flow of the river through this location for the first time in more than 150 years. Fish and other aquatic life are now able to move freely along this section of the Charles River and its tributaries, which will help restore a more robust ecosystem.

As this is the first dam that has been removed along the main stem of the Charles River, the Charles River Watershed Association hopes that the project will encourage other communities to consider dam removal and environmental restoration projects along the river.

Turning a Comment Into a Committee

By Kailyn Corrigan, Marketing Coordinator at Pare

In mid-March I was fortunate enough to attend the American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) Awards Gala. Our submission for the Bristol Stormwater Outfall Retrofit had received a Bronze Award, and I had helped assemble our submission. It was an exciting night where I was able to learn more about the A/E/C industry, meet plenty of new people, and eat a delicious dinner while getting to better know some of Pare’s senior staff.

Turning a Comment into a Committee

The morning after I attended the Awards Gala, I was doing my morning lap around the office and stopped at Civil Engineer, Victoria Howland’s desk. “How was it?!” she asked. As a fellow twenty-something recent graduate, Victoria understood that I had been nervous to keep up in conversation with our company’s senior-level leaders (being the A/E/C newbie that I am). “It was awesome,” I told her. I explained how I was seated next to Larry Riggs, our company President, and what an enjoyable conversation we shared about his professional past and my professional aspirations.

“Oh!” I added, “Right before the ceremony started, Larry told me this:

‘If you ever have a suggestion, issue, or see the need for improvement at Pare, feel free to let me know. We need young people like you to keep us in the loop.’

Isn’t that so thoughtful?”

Her eyes lit up, and a lightbulb appeared above her head. She enthusiastically agreed that was just about as kind and thoughtful as a company President could be.

In the typical and incredibly efficient fashion of engineers I’ve come to know, Tori drafted an email to me before I had even returned to my desk. In less than 10 minutes, Tori had established a plan to turn Larry’s comment into a committee.

At first I was hesitant, but the more we talked, the more her idea of a creative, organized, and productive way of accomplishing what Larry encouraged emerged. As someone with a lot to learn, I acquiesced and said I’d love to be involved. After meeting with Larry and the Civil Division Manager Ken DeCosta, Tori then thought it would be best to pick one young professional from each of our divisions: Civil (Victoria Howland – RI; Lindsey Machamer-MA), Environmental (Marc Weller, P.E.), Transportation (Bobby Sykes), Geotech (Jeff Costa), and Marketing (Me). And that’s how the Rising Professionals came to be!

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L to R: Marc Weller, Kailyn Corrigan, Bobby Sykes, Victoria Howland, Jeff Costa, Lindsey Machamer

Rising Professionals

Since forming in June, we have held monthly meetings where we discuss networking, project concerns, education opportunities, and our experience at Pare. Our first order of business was to create a lunch hour called the “Enlightened Bite” where young professionals or anyone interested could participate in a Q&A with our company leaders—each of whom have led very successful engineering careers. So far we have held two Enlightened Bites.

One of the committee goals is to prevent turnover. As anyone in this industry knows, it is the youngest employees who are most likely to explore options as a young professional, however sometimes it’s because they were looking for something they could have had if only they had asked or been provided more clarity. As a committee, we aim to consider what those factors may be and will share our collective opinions on improving them.

The Rising Professionals hope to alleviate some of the hiccups and miscommunication that exist between generations within the workplace. We hope to fix problems before they develop, and we hope to provide a voice for the young people at our company. We look forward to expanding the group and our goals as we continue to grow.

 

Pare Helps Raise Money for Smithfield Welfare Holiday Fund

By Brandon Blanchard, Senior Project Environmental Engineer at Pare

Pare employees from several divisions joined the Town of Smithfield on December 5th for their 5th Annual Bowling Tournament to benefit the Smithfield Welfare Department’s Holiday Fund. The Smithfield Welfare Department is a food pantry and resource department that offers confidential assistance to low-income and disadvantaged individuals and families in the Town of Smithfield. This tournament helps raise money for the fund at a time when families are particularly in need.

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Teams participating in this year’s tournament included local businesses, civic groups, and several Town departments. Many local businesses also donated goods and services for a tournament raffle, with proceeds to benefit the fund.

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PARE entered three 5-member teams. This is the third year that one of the Pare teams showed that they are as adept at bowling as they are at performing engineering services for the town, as they took home first-place!

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Bobby Sykes, Engineer at PARE, enthusiastically warms up for play.

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George Palmisciano (pictured at center of back row), Senior Vice President at PARE, participated on the Smithfield Rotary Club’s team.

Tiny… Bus?

By Victoria Howland, Civil Engineer at Pare

The man with the vision

The man with the vision

As a full-time undergraduate student who understands the cost of education, Jonathan VonReusner took it upon himself to reduce his living costs.  While attending a local private college and living at home, he was also interested in moving out to have his own space.  Needing the ability to get to and from classes while continuing his sustainably-centered upbringing, Jon took the logical route and turned to Craigslist.

The result was a $2500 used bookstore on wheels.  And what might one do with an old, secondhand bus, you might ask?  Why, turn it into an apartment, of course!

With no previous building experience, Jon spent the eight days of his spring break gutting and rebuilding his new space.  He installed new floors and did some woodworking to build shelving, a desk, and create storage compartments.  To maximize the ability of the bus to be self-sustaining, he mounted four solar panels to the roof that can generate 400 Watts.  For those cloudy days, Jon has two 125 Amp-hour batteries so that he won’t be completely off the grid.  Jon also has a propane tank and 10,000 Btu heater for when the temperature drops.with bed inside

The total cost of the project was just under $5600.  Room and board costs for the upcoming school year at the college Jon attends in upstate New York, which includes a mandatory meal plan, are $13,772.  If you consider half that number ($6886) to be solely room costs for living in a college dorm (which isn’t typically more than a couple hundred square feet), Jon has made a solid investment. Jon also considers “with education costs so high, tuition dollars are already paying for a wealth of communal facilities- things from a gym (bathroom and shower) to public transportation via shuttle system if the campus has it.  So for a student, a project like this hardly has to be mobile or have plumbing for it to still save thousands.”

The results of this project have given Jon peace of mind; living at home in a spacious house that had a lot of “stuff,” he never felt like he had complete control over things.  Now that he’s living in 90 square feet, he has had to pare down his belongings to the bare necessities which he says ironically makes him feel like there is more room to breathe.

desk

looking to front

inside pictures

For more information about this project, you can watch a video put together by Elisa Caffrey and Kristen Dirksen here.

 

What’s in the mail?

A lot of paper that goes right into the recycle bin, right?  Sure, there are the occasional catalogs that are fun to flip through or maybe the occasional flyer with coupons.  But do you ever get irritated by the number of times credit cards feel the need to remind you about their special offers or zero financing options?

Here are a few ways to avoid that paper from even entering your home:

  • Catalogs:  As they come into your house just simply call the 800 numbers and request that you no longer receive them.
  • Credit Card Offers:  To submit an opt-out request to have your name removed from their lists, visit:  http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0262-stopping-unsolicited-mail-phone-calls-and-email
  • Checks from your credit card companies:  Next time they come into your mailbox, call them and ask them to stop.
  • Bills and banking statements:  Most of us pay them online and get online statements, but if you don’t, most companies make it very simple to switch over to electronic payments and statements.  If this makes you nervous you can always save PDF’s of your statements and payment confirmations and keep back up files.

By taking a few extra minutes to stop the extra paper each time you spot it, you could stop it from ever entering your home.  This will not only save some trees and resources, but will also save you time.  You will avoid having to bring the paper into your house, sift through the junk mail, put it in the recycle bin and then remove it from of your house.

Give yourself and your family a challenge and see how many days in a row you can go without getting unnecessary mail and saving the excess paper.

For more helpful tips visit:  http://www.rirrc.org/resident/reduce-junk-mail/